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BPM White Papers and Case Studies

How to Program In-House, Part II

How to Program In-House, Part II

To learn how to Program in-House, we’ll cover Benchmarking to determine which system you need to bring programming under your roof. Then we’ll show you how you can start making positive ROI in weeks, not months or years.

Disaster Recovery for a Modern Manufacturing Operation

Disaster Recovery for a Modern Manufacturing Operation

It’s not a matter of “if” things go wrong. It’s a mathematical certainty. If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s prudent to be ready for just about anything. With a little forward planning, you should keep production moving. BPM’s systems are built to grow with your business; they have programmers that are still operating daily after 15 years or more. Contact your preferred Programming Center and BPM Microsystems to develop a disaster plan in advance.

How to Program In-House, Part I

How to Program In-House, Part I

In our example, we’ve got two programmable devices on our board: a TSOP and a QFP programmable device. The TSOP has 1200 Kilobytes of data; the QFP has 1 Gigabyte (which makes in-line or on-board programming a bad option).

Programming Devices— where no repairman has gone before

Programming Devices— where no repairman has gone before

Whether it’s a sensor on an anti-lock brake assembly or a telemetry chip on a satellite, there are increasing numbers of programmed devices where failure isn’t an option; either it’s difficult or impossible to replace in the field, or failure means the potential loss of irreplaceable life and equipment (or both). When it comes to programming a mission-critical antifuse device, who is the only authorized vendor on which Microsemi relies? BPM Microsystems.

3901 Job Changeovers– Fast and Easy

3901 Job Changeovers– Fast and Easy

Job changeovers can be a major hassle, but they don't have to be. In this live demonstration, the Sales Guy (Colin Harper) does a job changeover in 3 minutes (and almost half of that he's talking and not working). BPM automated programmer job changeovers are fast and...

Video: Bring your mission-critical programming in-house

Video: Bring your mission-critical programming in-house

Smaller OEMs, while perhaps having many of the same needs as the Automotive guys, were constrained by limited resources. As their programming needs outgrew their ability to produce on manual systems, the only option was to outsource to the programming houses or ship their component manufacturing off-shore. Then came the perfect storm of 2019: a crippling trade war, followed by a growing pandemic.

Bring your mission-critical programming in-house for less than the cost of outsourcing AND maintain control of your IP

Bring your mission-critical programming in-house for less than the cost of outsourcing AND maintain control of your IP

Moore’s law (Moore’s law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore%27s_law) )states integrated circuits double in both speed and number of circuits roughly every two years. As programmable devices become smaller, denser, and more complex, most machines that program those devices have become more expensive, and require experienced technicians to operate, maintain and troubleshoot.

Signal Integrity

Signal Integrity

Not all programming solutions are the same. If quality and maximum device life are important, it’s imperative to know what to look for. When evaluating a programming solution, ask about signal integrity. Review this white paper for helpful tips.

Are Market Forces Beyond Your Control Keeping You Up at Night?

Are Market Forces Beyond Your Control Keeping You Up at Night?

OEMs recognize the risk in outsourcing critical components, such as programmed devices, to off-shore suppliers. They are looking more closely at options that reduce their reliance on forces beyond their control in a way that reduces costs and speeds go-to-market. Download the white paper now.

What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed?

What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed?

There are lots of ways to get your data on devices, and there’s not one way that is always better than another. Options that are available today: • In-House Off-Line Programming• Program at ICT (in-circuit test)• Program with In-System Programming (ISP) at Functional...

Mastering eMMC Device Programming

Mastering eMMC Device Programming

Over the past decade, the demand for high-density, nonvolatile memories with a small footprint has increased dramatically. Two of the most popular markets driving this demand are handheld devices and automotive. Demand for handheld devices continues to drive the research for high-density, low power, low-cost, high-speed, nonvolatile memories while maintaining a small footprint. NAND-type flash memory is the perfect match for such a market. The increased consumer demand for high-tech features in automobiles, such as infotainment systems, is also a big driver of demand for high-density NAND-based devices.

BPM Microsystems Releases White Paper on Device-Driven Serialization

In the device programming industry, serialization is the process of writing unique data to each programmed device. It can be used to program basic numeric serial numbers to a single device address and can also be used to program more complex data such as MAC addresses, encryption keys, GUIDs and randomization seeds to several device addresses on each device.

Understanding NAND Flash Factory Programming

Understanding NAND Flash Factory Programming

During the manufacturing of electronic systems, blank non-volatile devices must often be programmed with initial data content. This allows the target system to get up and running, and is referred to as “factory programming,” “factory pre-programming,” or “bulk programming.” Generally, this is a very straightforward process that has been in place in the industry for many years. However, with NAND flash the process is more difficult.

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