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BPM compares the 1710 and the 2900 Manual Programmers

BPM compares the 1710 and the 2900 Manual Programmers

BPM compares the 1710 and the 2900 Manual Programmers

Join Shelby B., our Inside Sales Intern, as she breaks down the benefits of the 1710 7th Gen manual programmer vs. the 2900, our latest 9th Gen manual programmer.

Features of the 1710

  • Program up to 4 devices at once using the FX socket modules
  • Able to support the FSM48D (handles 98% of the DIP package devices) and FSM84UP (handles 95% of the PLCC package devices) modules
  • Supports hundreds of different packages with a broad range of socket modules.
  • Supports many legacy devices: PLD, MCU, PAL, GAL, CPLD, FPGA, EPROM, NOR Flash, EEPROM, Actel Antifuse devices, and more
  • 49400 devices supported out of the box
  • Supports high and very low voltage devices
  • Industry-standard for mission-critical Aerospace and Military programing
  • Lifetime software renewal is included with this machine

Features of the 2900

  • Modern High-Speed Universal Programmer capable of programming at the theoretical limits of the device
  • Proprietary Vector Engine Coprocessor that stands alone in the industry
  • Designed more like a high-speed test system
  • Boasts a support list of almost 40,000 devices
  • Weekly device support additions
  • Programs up to 4 devices at a time using socket cards and daughter cards (FVE, LX, WX, WAS, WS)
  • Can purchase a single socket card for first article qualification
  • Programmer workhorse, capable of programming 10’s of thousands of devices annually.
  • Up to twelve (12) 2900 programmers can run a job at a single workstation Has backward compatibility with (almost) all devices supported on the 8th Generation (2800, 3800, 4800, etc) and most devices supported on the 7th Generation (1710, 2710, 3710, etc)
  • Supports the NAND flash series of devices
  • Supports the eMMC series of devices including the following programming speed modes: SDR, DDR, HS200 & HS400
  • 256GB onboard programming memory, expandable to 512GB
  • Technology poised to support newer high-density memory devices
  • Both use BPWin, the best process software The user experience and therefore the learning curve moving from a 1710 to a 2900 is almost nil.

To find out more, check out https://bpmmicro.com/programmers/manu…

Transcript:
Hey, y’all this is Shelby at BPM Microsystems. I’m with the inside sales team and you probably recognize my voice from some of those phone calls I make every day following up on y’all’s quotes and things like that. Anyways I just want to dive right in and talk about the 1710 programmer and the 2900 programmer and talk about some of the features and benefits that we offer here at BPM Microsystems.

All right so let’s dive right in and talk about the 1710 programmer. this is our programmer that programs a lot of our legacy devices. it was actually created in 2004 so it’s one of our older machines but it’s still one of the most popular machines that we sell here at BPM. The 1710 supports hundreds of different packages with a broad range of socket modules and it also supports many legacy devices like the PAP the GAL the CPLD the FPGA the EEPROM nor flash EEPROM and Actel antifuse devices. And an amazing fact about the 7th gen is that we support 49,400 devices out of the box. Wow, that’s a lot! it also supports high and very low voltage devices and it’s the industry standard for mission-critical aerospace and military programming. pretty amazing right? the 7th gen is able to support the fsm48d which handles 98% of the dip package devices. this is it closed and this is it open pretty easy to take on and take off. Okay, so it also supports the fsm84up which handles 95% of the PLCC package devices. that’s it open.

Now that we’ve learned a little bit about the 1710 let’s move on over to the 9th gen our newest model. The 2900 is a modern high-speed universal programmer that is capable of programming at the theoretical limit of the device this handles a lot of our future devices our newer devices whereas the 1710 was handling a lot of our older devices on board it includes proprietary vector engine coprocessor that stands alone in the industry vastly increasing throughput for high-density devices the 9th gen boasts a support list of almost 40000 devices wow it has weekly device support additions and programs up to four devices at a time using socket cards and daughter cards fve, lx, wx, was, and ws unlike most of our competitors who require you to purchase multiple saga cards at once you only have to purchase one for your first article and if you need more capacity no problem you can add up to 11 more programmers for a total of 12 programmers on a single computer programming up to 48 devices at a time isn’t that pretty awesome? the 9th gen has backward compatibility with all socket modules supported on the 8th generation that’s the 2800 3800 4800 etc and also most socket modules on the 7th generation so that’s your 1710 2710 3710 etc

the 9th Gen supports the NAND flash series of devices supports the EMMC series of devices including the following program speed modes sdr, ddr, hs200, and hs400. the onboard memory of the 2900 is 256 gigabytes and is expandable up to 512 gigabytes. Wow that’s a lot of megabytes (off camera: you meangigabytes?) whatever.

So to sum up what we talked about today your 1710 programmer is going to be a little bit slower but it’s going to be for programming those older devices like your legacy devices whereas your 2900 is going to be a little faster and it’s better for newer and higher density devices. one of the benefits of having a 1710 over the 2900 is software is included for life so you don’t have to get a renewed quote for it every year like you would have to on the 2900. However the 2900 is going to be a lot faster and it has a lot sleeker design it’s just better for overall production if you’re going to be using those newer and higher density devices both of these are going to be using bp win so if you are looking to purchase a new programmer and you don’t want to get rid of your bp win you don’t have to fret because both of these use that actually all of our programmers do.

If you are interested or have any questions regarding these programmers you can email tech at bpmicro.com or if you’re interested in purchasing you can email inside sales bpmicro.com thank you guys so much for watching this video I really hope you enjoyed it and I will see you guys next time. bye!

(That’s like a lot of gigabytes)

Video: Bring your mission-critical programming in-house

Video: Bring your mission-critical programming in-house

Video: Bring your mission-critical programming in-house

Since about 2010, the strongest market segment for Automated Programmers has been Automotive suppliers. Automotive suppliers have an ever-increasing need for programming as cars become more complex and technology-driven. They also often require 3D inspection and laser marking to ensure consistent quality and to track inventory. Big projects, with millions of programmed devices, make device programming in-house a no-brainer.

Smaller OEMs, while perhaps having many of the same needs as the Automotive guys, were constrained by limited resources. As their programming needs outgrew their ability to produce on manual systems, the only option was to outsource to the programming houses or ship their component manufacturing off-shore.

Then came the perfect storm of 2019: a crippling trade war, followed by a growing pandemic.

Read more  Here

Hot buttons for OEMs and Contract Manufacturers

  • Faster time to market– go from prototype to production in weeks, not months
  • Expand vertical manufacturing capability
  • React to design changes quickly– tweaks in code can be updated to the workflow in just a few minutes
  • Intellectual Property physically protected from theft
  • Don’t have to shut down the line due to supply chain issues with programmed devices
  • Device programming is easier than ever before; Installed and operational in less than one week
  • Manual programmers can provide 10s of thousands of devices per year; when demand exceeds manual capacity, it’s easy to migrate to an automated system (same sockets, software, no need to redo first article, etc.)
  • One high-speed universal platform can support millions of devices per year, at an incredibly low cost per device
  • As demand increases, it’s easy to add additional sites for more capacity. If additional capacity is needed, add additional shifts without needing highly skilled technicians
  • Lower cost solutions (3901, 3928) provide the greatest value in the industry. ROI in months, not years.

See White Paper

3D Printing Allows Rapid Development, Lower Cost, Just-In-Time Inventory

3D Printing Allows Rapid Development, Lower Cost, Just-In-Time Inventory

3D Printing Allows Rapid Development, Lower Cost, Just-In-Time Inventory

We recently launched a variant product primarily due to 3D printing

BPM Microsystems manufactures device programmers (like copiers for microchips). Our mid-sized automated programmer, the 3910, can be configured with up to 4 of our programming sites, each of which can program up to 4 devices concurrently. The housing for the sites is a fabricated metal “cage”, which doesn’t allow for any custom configuration.

Enter the 3D printer…

Our engineering and production teams experimented with 3D printing individual site chassis. They were able to rapidly iterate different prototypes (rapid as in overnight compared to 5-8 weeks); final pieces were printed in carbon fiber filament.

“I’m moving BPM’s manufacturing and rapid prototyping into 3D printing because it’s so fast and flexible,” says Jon Bondurant, Vice President of Operations at BPM.  “The reduced turnaround times allow for fast iteration of continuous improvement cycles. 3D printing creates very little waste and uses recyclable materials making it a sustainable approach for replacing wasteful traditional manufacturing processes.”

3D printing enabled an existing platform to increase possible sites from 4 to 7 (a 75% increase in capacity) while reducing the cost of the site chassis from hundreds of dollars to a little over $10 in materials. Site chassis no longer need to be ordered in advance or pulled from existing inventory; they can be printed on-demand when the order comes in. We are looking into expanding into other areas, such as sockets and other parts that we previously machined on our CNC.

To see the 3928 go to bpmmicro.com/3928-7-site-aps/

BPM Microsystems Launches Sub-$90K Automated Programming System

BPM Microsystems Launches Sub-$90K Automated Programming System

3901 is the lowest cost APS with vision centering and truly universal support

BPM Microsystems launches its latest Automated Programming System (APS) today at the SMTA Guadalajara Show— the 3901. Rated at 1,088 Devices per Hour (DPH), the 3901 delivers the lowest cost of ownership in its class. Unlike other low-cost systems, the 3901 has vision centering to accurately align CSP devices, a full range of peripherals and up to 16 universal sockets to program the widest range of MCUs, Flash, eMMC, and EEPROMS at near theoretical speeds.

“Our engineering team has relentlessly focused on perfecting our 3-series to serve highly cost-sensitive users while still delivering the ease of use, feature-rich software, and quality that we are famous for,” says William White, founder and President of BPM Microsystems. “Unlike competing platforms, the 3901 offers WhisperTeach™ (automatic self-teaching for rapid setup) and universal sites that support everything from 30-year-old MCUs to the latest 256GB eMMC flash devices.”

“The 3901 offers features and performance not previously available in an entry-level APS,” says Colin Harper, Product Manager at BPM. “We expect the system will be a great solution for customers that require an APS with low cost of ownership and the ability to add capabilities as their needs change.”

The 3901 has WhisperTeach™, one of BPM’s award-winning exclusive features, as an option. WhisperTeach™ automatically teaches the critical Z-height with 15-micron accuracy for each pick/place location even for very small packages, saving an average of 83% of the time required for the job setup and increasing yield. There is also a CE Mark version for companies that require additional certification.

On-the-fly vision alignment is achieved with CyberOptics®, maintaining consistent speeds without sacrificing precision. While other competitive systems say their technology is “universal,” they may require different types of sites depending on the device mix. The 3901 has truly universal 9th Generation high-speed programming sites, supporting up to 16 devices programmed simultaneously, utilizing the same hardware, algorithms, and software (manual and automated systems). Vector Engine with BitBlast, standard on all BPM’s 9th Gen systems, increases the throughput for high-density eMMC devices, compared to other systems. 9th Gen Technology supports over 37,000 devices, over three times more than BPM’s closest competitor.

BPM manufactures its systems in the ISO 9001:2015 certified plant located in Houston, Texas.

BPM offers the 3910 and 4910 for customers who require greater throughput. To discover more about the 3901, such as pricing and specifications, go to bpmMicro.com/3901APS.

What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed?

What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed?

What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed?

There are lots of ways to get your data on devices, and there’s not one way that is always better than another. Options that are available today:

• In-House Off-Line Programming
• Program at ICT (in-circuit test)
• Program with In-System Programming (ISP) at Functional Test
• In-Line at Surface-Mount Technology (SMT) stage
• Program at Final Assembly
• Outsource to Programming Center

So which programming method is best in your specific application?

Automotive Programming by Volume of Devices 1The charts in this article are based on feedback from BPM Microsystem’s automotive customers

Just as an example, automotive OEMs use a variety of methods to get the job done. There’s an advantage to programming at the In-Circuit Test (ICT) where all of the components are already soldered on the board. By doing programming and testing in one step, you can combine several steps and save a lot of time. This only works when the programming time is less than a few seconds; if not, you could end up with a huge bottleneck, and in the event of an error you likely have to scrap the whole board or remove and re-solder the bad device and do it all again.


Consider this: the majority of devices programmed for automotive applications are done off-line (50%). Both in-house off-line and outsourcing to a programming house are programmed on the same equipment using off-line automated programming systems, such as BPM’s 4910.

Take a look at what happens when programming times go way up…


This chart factors in data density. When programming times are in excess of the beat rate Beat Rate is the total throughput on an SMT line on the SMT line, off-line programming accounts for 80% (in-house off-line + outsourced at programming house). As data density, device complexity and the number of devices in each car continue to increase, the need to reduce the cost of programming will be amplified like never before. In-system, in-circuit and In-line programming become less cost- and time-effective.

With off-line programming, the output can pace with the production line by adding shifts and/or adding machines in combination with strategic outsourcing. In-house off-line programming will continue to grow by providing unmatched efficiencies, producing a lower cost per device, and drastically lowering the lead-times necessary when you out-source. In addition, the software can be updated more frequently, allowing the line to have the latest revision of the source code. And from an intellectual property (IP) perspective, keeping your source code in-house makes your intellectual investment more secure from theft.2 IP Theft: See 2018 Bloomberg article

This is where we can help. BPM’s team can collect the specifications for your project and do a thorough analysis (benchmarks, ROI) and give recommendations. We’ll guide you to ask the right questions. We’re not always the best option, and if that’s the case, we’ll let you know. When you factor quality, ease-of-use, throughput, cost-per-device and long shelf-life (some of our machines are still producing after 10+ years), BPM should be part of the conversation.


Definitions:

Off-line programming is the process of programming the device (either by a manual or automated process) prior to SMT or manual soldering the device to the board.

Surface-mount technology (SMT) is a method for producing electronic circuits in which the components are mounted or placed directly onto the surface of printed circuit boards (PCBs). An electronic device so made is called a surface-mount device (SMD).

In-system programming (ISP), also called in-circuit serial programming (ICSP), is the ability of devices to be programmed while installed in a complete system. The primary advantage of this feature is that it allows manufacturers of electronic devices to integrate programming and testing into a single production phase, and save money, rather than requiring a separate programming stage prior to assembling the system.

CSP Device Programming Strategies for the C-Suite

CSP Device Programming Strategies for the C-Suite

CSP Device Programming Strategies for the C-Suite

By Srivatsan Mani, former Director of Engineering, BPM Microsystems, Inc.
Originally published in Vol. 18, No. 2 of Global SMT & Packaging Magazine

Good things come in small packages, but small packages can be tricky and costly to handle. The trend for higher density devices and smaller package sizes creates a unique set of challenges for the programming centers and manufacturers programming those devices. A light puff of air sends small parts flying, and misalignment of less than .2mm creates placement issues. This article shares best practices decision makers should consider when purchasing or upgrading production equipment to program small IC devices to maximize speed, quality and cost savings. 

The rise in demand for small device packages

Mobile phones, PDAs, and other mobile products continue to take on new roles such as digital camera, video camera, and TV receiver. These functions require an increased number and greater variety of semiconductors in order to operate, while consumers want their finished products in ever-smaller form factors. Thus, as mobile phone sales have soared, demand for the chip-scale package (CSP) has increased faster than any other IC package type over the past decade or so. The demand for smaller packages with higher densities affects other segments including automotive, industrial, medical device and Internet-of-Things. As the need for complex electrical circuits increases, programmed devices are developed in smaller and smaller packages to free up much-needed space in circuit design. As a result, programming centers and manufacturers are moving towards purchasing or retrofitting existing pick and place machines that are capable of programming such devices with little or no device failures.

Manufacturer challenges handling small devices

Pick and place errors account for the majority of quality issues when programming small devices. Pick and place inaccuracy occurs when the machine is not taught precisely or is inaccurately placing parts due to unaccounted longer x-y axis settling times before a place. Teaching the z-height for a machine manually is nearly impossible for small devices, and for larger devices, operator skill and experience are required. Programming centers and manufacturers incur added costs for labor, machine idle time, lost devices, damaged devices, escapes, and poor yield.

Process control improvements

Automated IC device programmers lift and move devices using a vacuum nozzle attached to a robotic machine to perform repetitive operations. The negative pressure lifts the object and holds it against the nozzle while moving it to the desired location and then setting it into place. However, very small objects, such as small computer or digital chips, including Wafer Level Chip Scale Packaging (WLCSP), small-outline transistors (SOT), and dual-flat no-leads (DFN), may be lifted by the nozzle prior to contact by the nozzle with the object. The vacuum may cause the object to “jump” up to the nozzle.

Operators using process control software teach the robotic machine the height of the object before it begins repetitive production operations. When setting up a job, operators use the process control software to teach the robotic machine the location (x, y, and z) of the input media, output media, peripherals, and programming site and socket. To teach z-height, the operator depresses the nozzle on the handler until it just touches the device. With IC device packages getting smaller, reaching .305mm thick and sizes of 1.7mm x 1.4mm, manually teaching the z-height of the device into the socket is nearly impossible. An operator cannot clearly see deep into the socket to see when the nozzle touches the device. With a flashlight and the assistance of a co-worker, multiple attempts and adjustments occur to determine the z-height.

During a teach cycle, the jump by the device causes the height to be measured incorrectly by the robotic machine that moves the nozzle. Subsequently, during repetitive operations, this incorrect height causes the machine to attempt to pick up the object before making contact. This leads to pick and place errors, dropped parts, cracked parts, and continuity errors. If alignment is off by even .2mm, the teach process must be repeated to avoid cracking or otherwise damaging the device.

Customers report manual teaching small devices takes up to 30 minutes per station. For programming centers with five changeovers per day, this costs 2.5 hours machine idle time plus the costs of labor and lost or damaged devices. Programming centers and manufacturers should consider process control software and equipment with automated teaching capabilities for small parts. For example, BPM Microsystems WhisperTeach™ automates the task for the operator. It completes the task in 4.37 minutes with a standard deviation of 0.5mils, resulting in a savings of up to 25.63 minutes per station or 2.14 hours per day with five changeovers per day.

Accurately taught jobs improve yield by eliminating pick or place errors. Customers have reported yields as poor as 80% on very small parts using manual teach depending on operator skill. Process control software with automated z-height teaching produces a job yield of 99.99% by eliminating any teach related issues.

Production control efficiencies

After completing the job setup and production begins, the accuracy of placement is critical to avoid damaging the device. Manufacturers need to ensure their systems self-calibrate z-height during production to eliminate the need for manual adjustments to compensate for variations in atmospheric pressure, nozzle size, flow rates, filter conditions, and more. This self-calibration by the machine ensures accurate handling throughout the job. In addition to an intelligent process control software and pneumatics systems, look for systems equipped with a high-quality vision system to ensure proper alignment of small parts before placement at each station. When integrated with the production software, vision systems allow the machine to align the device while in motion at high speeds.

For small parts, placement accuracy can be a challenge for systems that are unable to settle their x-y motion fast enough. Look for systems with designs allowing them to operate at maximum throughput without having to slow down the system to handle small parts. Customers achieve faster throughput and better reliability with a well-designed motion system.

3D inspection to increase the quality

■ Precise Laser Micromark Measuring .1mm x .1mm.

Manufacturers looking to reduce scrap monitor each stage of the manufacturing process and take corrective action early. Device programming systems equipped with 3D inspection systems identify damaged parts early in the process. This allows manufacturers to take quick corrective action, resulting in higher quality, minimized reflow and lower overall costs.

3D inspection systems provide full device package validation after programming. High-performance systems support the verification of a variety of device packages including BGA, CSP, QFP, TSOP, SOIC, and J-Lead devices. When looking for an inspection system, features should include measurements for coplanarity, bent lead, pitch, width, diameter, standoff and XY errors.

Inspecting the coplanarity on leaded devices, such as the SOT-23 that measures 2.2mm x 2.7mm, ensures you do not exceed the manufacturer tolerance, which can create long-term reliability concerns of the device. The stress from bent leads may cause cracks in the package, reducing resistance against moisture and consequently present failure in the field due to internal corrosion. 3D inspection systems also identify devices with defective or missing balls on a BGA. By recognizing and removing damaged devices before final placement, manufacturers can prevent quality issues that would otherwise escape. This, in turn, improves production yield and process stability.

Laser marking for traceability

Manufacturers must thoroughly implement traceability control to maintain and confirm quality. Marking a device with a serial number, for example, enables traceability to the programming system, the site and even the socket that programmed the device.

Smaller, thinner devices require fine control of the laser power to avoid damaging the device. Additionally, smaller devices require and higher resolution marking capabilities. When purchasing a laser for your device programming system, look for a hybrid laser system that combines fiber and Nd:YAG laser technologies for precision marketing quality. Micromarking information in a limited space requires ultra-fine marketing capabilities, which is impossible with conventional laser marketing systems. Hybrid laser marking utilizes fine laser setting control, resulting in shallower marks, vivid coloration and a lower thermal impact.

By recognizing and removing damaged devices before final placement, manufacturers can prevent quality issues that would otherwise escape. This, in turn, improves production yield and process stability.

A laser with a power monitor control provides high precision calibration of the laser mark, allowing accurate measure and control of laser energy output. The ability to monitor and control the laser power avoids damage to the device and reduces scrap. In electronics manufacturing, device damage affects quality, reliability, and profitability. A hybrid laser is an optimal solution for small device marking applications where it is necessary to eliminate the effect of heat transfer and control the maximum penetration depth while also providing high-contrast micromarking.

Conclusion

Modern electronic products favor higher density devices in smaller package sizes. Manufacturers and programming centers are purchasing or upgrading existing IC device programming systems to support the demands of programming small devices. A unique set of challenges exist to pick the small device out of tape, place it in the socket, program the device, laser mark the device, inspect the device through 3D inspection, and then place it out to tape. All of this needs to happen quickly, efficiently and with high quality. Decision makers need to consider many requirements when selecting an IC device programming system capable of handling small parts. Ensure the process control software and pneumatic system are qualified for small part handling and automatically teach z-height. Look for a self-calibrating machine with a high-performance vision system capable of aligning devices at high speed, on-the-fly, during production to maximize DPH. Systems with well-designed motion systems achieve faster throughput and higher reliability. Invest in a hybrid laser with power monitoring controls and micromarking capabilities to ensure device traceability. Finally, select a 3D inspection system that performs full device validation after programming, including checks for bent leads and defective balls, for quality and lower overall costs. Following these strategies will ensure your IC device programming system handles small devices with the speed, quality and overall cost savings required for modern electronics manufacturing.

Link to original article

Originally published in the February 2018 edition of Global SMT & Packaging 

SRIVATSAN MANI

SRIVATSAN MANI

Former Director of Engineering

Srivatsan Mani was the Director of Engineering who works with electronics manufacturers and programming centers to innovate solutions that modernize and improve their businesses. With more than 16 years of experience working with device programming systems, process control software, and device programming technology at BPM Microsystems, Inc., Srivatsan knows how to leverage technology to speed up the process while producing higher quality products at lower overall costs. Srivatsan led the development of the award-winning VectorEngine™ site programming technology, patent-pending WhisperTeach™ automated z-height teaching solution, and BPWin™ process control software. Srivatsan holds a degree in electronics and communication engineering and masters in computer systems engineering.