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BPM Releases Support For Renesas Automotive Microcontroller

BPM Releases Support For Renesas Automotive Microcontroller

BPM Releases Support For Renesas Automotive Microcontroller

Renesas R7F7015433AFP-C for Automotive Electrical Body Applications

The RH850/F1K is one group of single-chip microcontrollers in the RH850/F1x series which is designed for automotive electrical body applications. While it achieves low power consumption, the internal flash memory ranges from 768KB to 2MB and the package covers a wide range from 100 to 176 pins. Also, a CAN FD interface has been added (premium products only) and the CPU operating frequency has been improved to 120MHz. See more here.

  • Renesas R7F7015433AFP-CPackages: QFP(144)
  • Category: MCUs and MPUs – RH850 Family (Automotive only) – RH850/F1K
  • Device Type: 32-bit G3M CPU core
  • Device Size: 2MBytes Code Flash + 32KBytes User Area + 64KBytes Data Flash
  • Algorithm Programming Method: 3-Wire Serial I/O Mode
  • 9th/8th Gen Socket Solution: FVE2ASM144LQFPA
  • Available on BPM’s Process software BPWin Versions released after 01/14/2021
  • Note: Replaceable burn-in test socket

Unique Support

As of publication, BPM has the only supported solution for this particular device. Renesas devices currently supported by BPM stand at 1,762.

  Supported* Socket
Elnec No  
Data I/O No  
Dediprog No  
BPM Yes FVE2ASM144LQFPA

*As of publication

9th Gen

9th Generation Site Technology delivers the fastest programming times, 2 to 9 times faster for flash devices. Vector Engine Co-processing with BitBlast offers the fastest programming speeds in the industry, vastly increasing throughput.

FVE2ASM144LQFPABPM Advantages

The socket card (FVE2ASM144LQFPA) is built with a replaceable burn-in test socket. This means when the socket wears out, simply remove it and replace it with LSOCQ144EA-2, rather than replacing the whole socket card (adapter). This socket allows for up to 2 devices to be programmed in parallel and will work with both manual and automated systems on 9th and 8th Gen systems.

BPWin Software Support

In order to fully take advantage of new device support from BPM Microsystems, you’ll need a version of BPWin after 1/14/2021. All engineering manual programmers (they start with a “1” such as the 1710) come with lifetime software support. New programmers come with one year of software support; if your software contract has lapsed, please contact Inside Sales to take advantage of daily additions and improvements in device support.

Number of Devices Supported by 9th Gen

Manual Programmers for this Device

Available for purchase in North America (US/Canada/Mexico)

2900L Manual Programmer with Actuator

$6,995.00

Available on backorder

2900 9th Gen Manual Programmer

$5,995.00

Available on backorder

BPM releases support for Atmel High-Performance PLD

BPM releases support for Atmel High-Performance PLD

Atmel Support for SOIC (Small Outline Integrated Circuit) ATF16V8B-15SU-T

The ATF16V8B-15SU-T provides edge-sensing low-power PLD (Programmable Logic Device) solution with low standby power consumption (5mA typical). It powers down automatically to the low-power mode through the Input Transition Detection (ITD) circuitry when the device is idle. See more here.

  • Fuses: 2194
  • Gates: 250
  • Package: SOIC(20)
  • Temp Range: -40C to +85C
  • Electrical Erase: Yes
  • Secure: Yes
  • 9th Gen Socket Solution: FVE4ASMR20SB
  • Available on BPM’s Process software BPWin Versions released after 01/14/2021

The PLD programming support from BPM has been qualified by the Atmel PLD Applications group. Read more here.

Unique Support

As of publication, BPM has the only supported solution for this particular device. Atmel devices are particularly “challenging” to support, and no one has as many Atmel devices supported as BPM (currently 4781).

  Supported* Socket
Data I/O no  
Dediprog no  
BPM Yes FVE4ASMR20SB

*As of publication

9th Gen

9th Generation Site Technology delivers the fastest programming times, two to nine times faster for flash devices. Vector Engine Co-processing with BitBlast now supports HS400. BitBlast offers the fastest programming speeds in the industry, vastly increasing throughput.

BPM Advantages

The socket card (FVE4ASMR20SB) is built with a replaceable socket. This means when the socket wears out, simply remove it and replace it with LSOCS20EA, rather than replacing the whole socket card (adapter). This socket card allows for up to 4 devices to be programmed in parallel per site and will work with both manual and automated systems.

BPWin Software Support

In order to fully take advantage of new device support from BPM Microsystems, you’ll need a version of BPWin after 1/14/2021. All engineering manual programmers (they start with a “1” such as the 1710) come with lifetime software support. New programmers come with one year of software support; if your software contract has lapsed, please contact Inside Sales to take advantage of daily additions and improvements in device support.

Device Search Socket Decoder Types of Programmables

 

Number of Devices Supported by 9th Gen

Complete Ecosystem

BPM Microsystems has ownership of all designs, manufacturing, and support for all programming sites, robotics, vision systems, and software, so we can provide unmatched support and responsiveness

  • Reduce your time to market by doing New Product Introduction/First Article through Automated Production with the same hardware, algorithms, and software

9th Generation Site Technology

Manual Programmers for this Device

Available for purchase in North America (US/Canada/Mexico)

2900L Manual Programmer with Actuator

$6,995.00

Available on backorder

2900 9th Gen Manual Programmer

$5,995.00

Available on backorder

New HS400 Device Support for SanDisk, SK-Hynix

New HS400 Device Support for SanDisk, SK-Hynix

SANDISK SDINBDG48GXIBPM Microsystems is pleased to announce new device support for SanDisk and Hynix eMMC devices with significantly faster HS400 protocol

SanDisk SDINBDG4-8G is an 8GB iNAND Flash Storage device primarily for connected and autonomous cars. Western Digital, the maker of SanDisk, describes this family of flash devices: “Leveraging enhanced flash storage technology for superior reliability, the new iNAND storage devices are designed to support data demands of the latest Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). These include cutting-edge infotainment, navigation, HD mapping, V2V/V2I communication, drive event recorders, and autonomous driving. The iNAND EFDs (Embedded Flash Drives) delivers dependable performance even in the most extreme environmental conditions, including ambient temperatures ranging from -40°C to 105°C. Western Digital’s robust iNAND embedded flash drives are ideal for a wide range of connected automotive systems and environments. All of our automotive solutions are AEC-Q100 qualified and are designed to meet the reliability requirements of the automotive industry.”

Typical applications and workloads for the SDINBDG4 are Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS), Navigation / Infotainment, HD Mapping, V2V/V2I Communication, Digital Cluster, Drive Event Recorders, Autonomous Drive, and more.

  • Package: BGA(153)
  • Device Type: eMMC
  • Algorithm Programming Mode: HS400
  • Maximum Interface Speed: 400MB/second
  • 9th Gen Socket Solutions: FVE4ASMC153BGJ, FVE4ASMC153BGZ*
  • Available on BPWin Versions released after 02/03/2021

Hynix

Hynix Semiconductor H26M41208HPRQHynix Semiconductor H26M41208HPRQ is an 8GB eMMC device in a standard FBGA153 package.  The “Q” version is specifically designed for Automotive applications requiring greater temperature ranges. Hynix describes their eMMC 5.1 device family as a “wide-ranging lineup with longevity of support.” It delivers optimized performance with a maximum interface speed of 400MB per second.

  • Packages: BGA(153)
  • Device Type: eMMC 5.1
  • Algorithm Programming Mode: HS400
  • Maximum Interface Speed: 400MB/second
  • 9th Gen: FVE4ASMC153BGJ, FVE4ASMC153BGZ*
  • Available on BPWin Versions released after 03/11/2021

HS400

While BPM has supported both of these devices in the past, HS400 enables programming eMMC devices at greater speeds (up to 400MB/Second) with improved throughput. From our research, we found other device programming companies also (mostly) support these devices, but they don’t mention HS400, so it’s safe to say they don’t support it.

9th Gen

9th Generation Site Technology delivers the fastest programming times, 2 to 9 times faster for flash devices. Vector Engine Co-processing with BitBlast now supports HS400. BitBlast offers the fastest programming speeds in the industry, vastly increasing throughput for high-density managed NAND devices that utilize the eMMC interface.

BPM Advantages

The two socket cards specified (FVE4ASMC153BGJ [available to purchase on the web**] & FVE4ASMC153BGZ) both have compression-mounted sockets. This means when the socket wears out, simply remove it and replace it with LSOCB169KA-3-MOD, rather than replacing the whole socket card (adapter). Both BPM sockets allow for up to 4 devices to be programmed in parallel and will work with both manual and automated systems. In contrast, Elnec’s socket solution is only one-up per programmer, it doesn’t utilize HS400, and they don’t have an automated solution.

BPWin Software Support

In order to fully take advantage of new device support from BPM Microsystems, you’ll need the latest version of BPWin, BPM’s process software. All engineering manual programmers (they start with a “1” such as the 1710) come with lifetime software support. New programmers come with one year of software support; if your software contract has lapsed, please contact Inside Sales to take advantage of daily additions and improvements in device support.

Device Search Socket Decoder Types of Programmables


*FVE4ASMC153BGZ uses a newer board design optimized for HS400; allows for even cleaner waveforms, with higher potential yields
**FVE4ASMC153BGJ is available for purchase online in the US, Mexico and Canada

 

Number of Devices Supported by 9th Gen

Complete Ecosystem

BPM Microsystems has ownership of all designs, manufacturing, and support for all programming sites, robotics, vision systems, and software, so we can provide unmatched support and responsiveness

  • Reduce your time to market by doing New Product Introduction/First Article through Automated Production with the same hardware, algorithms, and software

9th Generation Site Technology

Manual Programmers for this Device

Available for purchase in North America (US/Canada/Mexico)

2900L Manual Programmer with Actuator

$6,995.00

Available on backorder

2900 9th Gen Manual Programmer

$5,995.00

Available on backorder

Offline Automated Programming vs Inline SMT Programming

Offline Automated Programming vs Inline SMT Programming

In the case study “What is the Best Way to Get Devices Programmed,” BPM Microsystems explored six main ways to get your data on devices. The answer is “Depends.” The short answer is there is no one way that is always better than another. This case study explores two of those six methods: Inline SMT programming and Off-line programming.

A small segment of electronic manufacturing services (EMS) and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can use inline programming solutions effectively and economically, compared to off-line programming. A lack of flexibility, high cost, and the specter of obsolescence should raise questions about the long-term viability of Inline programming.

RoadRunner Inline Programmer from Data I/O

 

 

 

Inline SMT Programming

Inline SMT programming is a solution to consider for narrow segments of device programming requiring short programming times, with medium to high volume, for just one device type. Back in the day, that’s what programmed some of the most popular cell phones, when on-board memory sizes were Mbits compared to today’s designs with Gbit memory sizes. Benefits of inline programming include just-in-time programming (which has its own problems lately; see article here), simplified inventory management, and lean manufacturing. If that sounds like your process, and that process won’t change in the next five years, inline programming should be considered (or possibly programming at test, but that’s for a future article).

RoadRunner is an inline SMT programming solution from Data I/O; it has been on the market since the early 2000s. Data I/O advertise the RoadRunner as The world’s only just-in-time inline programming system.” There are other inline programmers as well; for the most part, they are sophisticated, albeit expensive, home-grown solutions.

When programming times are in excess of the beat rate  (beat rate is the total throughput per time on an SMT line) of the SMT line, inline SMT programming becomes less attractive because the programmer is not providing enough parts to keep up with the line speed. In short, programming becomes the line bottleneck. As data density, device complexity, and the number of devices continue to increase, the need to reduce the cost of programming will be amplified like never before. Inline programming becomes less cost-effective and less time-effective as programming time increases because multiple units may be required to keep pace with the line beat rate. 

Inline is Wide

Inline solutions attach at the tape feeder table, and are large, compared to standard tape feeders, taking up to 6 (or more) feeder positions on the placement machine. Depending on the complexity and mix of devices delivered on the tape reel, there may not be spare “real estate” for the inline programmer. It’s important to verify there’s room before committing to an inline solution.

Multiple inline programmers may be required per machine if the programming time is longer than a single system can keep up with, or if multiple programmed devices are needed. That has a double cost: less available tape space, and the expense of additional inline programmers. The problem is obvious. The potential requirement to add another placement machine makes device programming inline a very expensive process. 

Socket Capacity

RoadRunner utilizes sockets to program devices. Sockets are the electro-mechanical interface that uploads the signal from the computer to program a device. A small robotic arm moves the blank device to an awaiting socket and then returns the freshly programmed device to the tape, which feeds directly to the SMT pick and place machine. Sockets are “consumables” and require cleaning, maintenance, and replacement when their lifecycle is complete. Normally, the lifecycle can be managed between shifts, but what happens when a socket fails? Your expensive SMT will have to idle until the socket is replaced. BPM Automated systems have built-in fault tolerance; if a socket fails, the system simply bypasses that socket until it can be replaced. This may only cause a slight reduction in throughput, rather than shutting down the SMT line.

Backups

Inline programmers require redundant back-ups because of the high cost of line-down events on the SMT line. What happens if the backup inline programmers go down as well? Regardless, backup inline programmers are an additional expense, but beware if you get talked into buying only one.

Depending on the number of SMT lines at your facility, each placement machine will require its own set. This can begin to add up quickly, especially if you factor in backups. What’s more, if you have different SMT equipment, you probably can’t share a RoadRunner made for different machine brands: for example, a RoadRunner designed for a Fuji SMT most likely won’t operate on a Juki machine.

Expensive

Inline SMT programming solutions tend to run on the pricey side, especially when backup systems are factored in. If the SMT line is idle, the inline programmer is idle as well. If expensed using a standard five-year depreciation, there’s no guarantee that an inline programmer will not be sitting on a shelf while it’s still being “paid” for (perhaps by no fault of its own, but because of changes in programmables or a loss of a particular project). Today, product life cycles are shorter than ever before. Consider the financial model before investing in inline programming. 

Crystal Ball

Unless you can see into the future, it’s difficult to know what your SMT line will look like in a year, let alone five. What happens if your project changes or design modifications necessitate different programmables? RoadRunner, for example, is offered in a range of sizes; if a larger device is spec’d, you may need a new RoadRunner, while the “old” programmer collects dust on a shelf. More likely, more data is required on the device, which will slow the entire line, unless more inline programmers are purchased. 

Off-line Programming

Off-line programming, like the name implies, is a separate process where blank chips are programmed on high-speed robotic systems and placed into output media, usually tape. Off-line machines are best suited for medium to high volume, high mix (many different types of devices); they have more capacity and greater flexibility. They can change quickly to adapt to new projects and will not become obsolete when a project changes. For instance, BPM Microsystems Automated Programmers have almost no size or type limitation for devices; they can handle CSP devices as small as 0.5 x 1.0 mm, or QFP devices up to 35x35mm.

Flexible

The flexibility comes from the sockets. Depending on the device, up to 4 sockets can be installed on each site. Therefore, it’s possible to program thousands of devices per hour (depending on the complexity of programming specifications and peripheral operations, such as laser marking). The same socket used to create the first article is also used for production.

Same Process

It’s worth mentioning that off-line programming utilizes the exact same process used on placement machines: reels of components and devices are loaded by an operator. Reels of programmed devices take up less space on the placement machine (1 or 2 slots) than an inline programmer (6 or more). What’s more, inline programming systems require fresh reels of blank devices periodically, requiring a pause while the operator feeds in a new tape. Devices programmed off-line can be set up with two (or more) locations the SMT machine can use; as the tape reel runs out, it shifts over to a fresh reel while the operator replaces the empty reel with a new one.

Scalable

Off-line programming systems are scalable. As needs change, you can add sockets, sites, shifts, or even additional systems. BPM systems make adding additional shifts simple. Set-ups and operations do not require a highly experienced technician. BPM systems are designed to run three shifts with over 85% utilization rate. One off-line Automated Programming System can support multiple SMT lines. 

High Mix

Inline SMT programming systems, such as RoadRunner, are not made for high-mix programming. Each system is dedicated to a particular device; depending on the device, you may need a whole new RoadRunner. BPM Automated systems can switch jobs in typically 15 minutes or less; they are up and running while comparable systems require two to three times more time to set up. That means BPM systems are producing while other systems are still being set up. Over the course of a year, this can equal hundreds of additional hours of productivity, even in one-shift shops.

Small Footprint

Automated programming systems are surprisingly compact when you consider their capabilities. BPM’s latest system, the 3928, is 162 x 96cm (tape in/out takes up a little more room) and is capable of programming 28 devices simultaneously. It uses standard factory power; the only additional requirement is compressed air. Typically, the system can be installed on the same floor as the SMT line. Machines are installed and operational within five working days.

Conclusion

  Inline SMT Programming Off-line Programming
Number of tape slots on SMT machine Up to 6 for each device 1-2 (depends on device/tape width)
Number of programmers 1 for each device (plus backup) 1
(can supply several SMT lines)
High volume programming Yes Yes
High mix  No Yes
Universal  No Yes
Require advanced operator No No
Scalable Limited/ Expensive* Yes
Need backup systems Yes No (spare site recommend)

*Inline is scalable but the cost is double to go from 1 to 2. Offline has an incremental cost much less than inline

Inline SMT programming is a solution to consider for high volume, low mix programming with very short programming times. It lacks the flexibility available from off-line programming systems. With advances in complex programming, especially for automotive applications, inline may be a good fit now, but will that still be true a year from now? For a growing number of companies and applications, off-line programming may be a future-proof investment that generates positive ROI in weeks, not years (see ROI article).

For more information about BPM’s Automated Programming Systems or to speak to one of our experts about your particular requirements, please call +1 (713) 263-3776 or toll-free in the US or Canada (855) SELL BPM.

Legacy Automated Programmers from BPM Microsystems

Legacy Automated Programmers from BPM Microsystems

Legacy Automated Programmers from BPM Microsystems

Hundreds Still Running

Several hundred of our legacy Automated Programming Systems (defined as machines we no longer offer for sale) are still in operation; many 15 years and older. There may be some compelling reasons to upgrade (such as capacity issues, or slower programming times for newer devices), but if it ain’t broke, why fix it? Many of these older machines have been paid off for years (other than spare parts and consumables), so as long as they are still productive, an older system is a pure profit center.

BPM still supports many systems (there are some exceptions, so please check the End of Life page). You can continue to get parts and support with a current hardware and/or software contract.

 

Upgrade

To find out more about upgrading your existing 3800MK2 or 3900 to make it faster and have greater, more accurate throughput, let us know!

Available Upgrades

APS legacy models 3800MK2 and 3900 use upward vision camera technology for component alignment. These APS can be upgraded to get new hardware and software for on-the-fly vision alignment and higher performance with a CyberOptics on-the-fly alignment camera and other improvements with the Z and Theta Axis.

Compelling Reasons to Upgrade

Performance: The 3800MK2 to 3810 upgrade combined with other hardware improvements will allow 800 DPH (3800MK2) to an impressive 1200 DPH. This is accomplished because of the sophisticated CyberOptic LNC-120 for on-the-fly vision alignment and improved pick and place movement using hardware/software advancements.

The 3900 to 3910 upgrade improves Devices Per Hour from 1100 DPH (3900) to an impressive 1432 DPH for the 3910.

Component Automeasure, supported with the CyberOptics alignment camera allows customers to set up jobs more quickly. WhisperTeach allows for faster job setups and changeovers.

CSP devices are supported. The LNC-120 is a sophisticated alignment camera capable of accurately and repeatedly aligning the smallest programmable devices presently on the market as of September 2019.

This is not simply a “camera change.” Upgrade include a new e-chain, improved hardware and performance improvements for the Z-Axis, plus faster, more accurate, and faster Theta performance (rotation alignment).

Legacy Machines Still In Operation

  APS Model Operating Machines by Generation
3000FS
3610 6th Gen

6th Gen launched in 2000 (20 years)
4610
3710-3710MK2

7th Gen

7th Gen launched in 2007 (13 years)

4710
3800 8th Gen

8th Gen launched in 2011 (8+ years)
3800MK2
3800W7-32
4800
4800W7-32

 

Windows 10

We’re pleased to announce that BPWin Windows 10 Compatible version went live with the launch of version 7.0.0. BPWin is currently compatible with Windows XP, Windows 7, and Windows 10, 64-Bit operating system; users can now take advantage of the newest Windows operating system with greater speed, security, and access to the latest OS updates (Microsoft announced it will cease support for legacy OS– see full info from Microsoft here).

Important: you’ll need a current Software Support Contract for all APS and 2XXX Manual Programmers. Contact Inside Sales for contract support.

If you’re interested in Windows 10 support on your current system, contact Technical Support for more information. You may need additional hardware to support Windows 10.

Upgrade

To find out more about upgrading your existing 3800MK2 or 3900 to make it faster and have greater, more accurate throughput, let us know!

Universal Device Programmers

Universal Device Programmers

Some solutions are more “universal” than others

There are quite a few device programming solutions that describe themselves as “universal.” You would think everyone is using the term “universal” the same way. Think again.

“Universal” as an adjective, means: “of, affecting, or done by all people or things in the world or in a particular group; applicable to all cases,” (Definitions from Oxford Languages). What does it mean to be “universal?” First, let’s go back to the first “universal” programmer…

BPM 1200, the First Universal Programmer

In the early 1990s, there was no such thing as a universal device programmer. If you wanted to program a different family of devices (for instance, an EPROM and a TSOP), it required purchasing two (or more) different programmers. The reason was the interface between the device and the programmer was hard-wired.

In 1992, BPM Microsystems (back then, they were called BP Microsystems) developed the 1200 Manual Programmer with a serial port connector. It was the first “universal” programmer– you could request additional device interfaces that would allow you to program more than just one device (or family of devices). BPM developed the first socket adapters, which are now used by all off-line device programmers.

Universal Hardware/Software 

Each device has specific programming parameters. It is not just a matter of sending an electrical signal to a specific pin—each device requires a unique algorithm to ensure it is programmed correctly. 

For instance, for a device programmer to support a NAND flash device, two algorithms are needed. The first is the conventional device programming algorithm as specified by the semiconductor manufacturer. The second is the BBM algorithm. The BBM algorithm is a user-selectable software module that interfaces with the device programming algorithm. Its implementation depends upon the target system, not just the NAND device. The challenge is in obtaining a well-defined BBM algorithm specification. See White Paper Here.

Algos “translate” the data into a specific pattern based on the specs from the semi-house. It also sends the correct electrical signal to the correct pin. See Signal Integrity Article Here.

In 1996, BPM introduced the 4100, the first universal fine-pitch automated pick-and-place programming system. Finally, there was a solution to program, at scale, a variety of devices. Again, prior to the 4100, pick-and-place programmers could only program-specific families of devices.

Fast-forward to Today

BPM Microsystems pioneered universal device programming, but nowadays, most device programming solutions are “universal,” right? While it’s true that the days of single-use programmers (except for some extremely high-volume machines) died 25 years ago, that doesn’t mean that all “universal” programmers are truly universal.

Take, for instance, Data I/O. They make automated and manual device programmers in the US and China; they promote their programmers as “universal,” but that depends on your device programming requirements. Data I/O uses two different programming site technologies. Their FlashCORE III sites were developed in 2009; their newer LumenX sites came out in 2016. Let’s say you have a mix of eMMC, MCU, and EPROM devices to program. Their “universal” solution would require two sets of sites; LumenX sites for faster programming with eMMC devices and FlashCORE III to program the others. Are they, in fact, “universal?” Sounds like “not really.”

BPM’s 9th Generation Technology launched in 2016. 9th Gen sites with Vector Engine™ Co-Processor accelerate flash memory waveforms for programming near the theoretical limits of silicon design. The faster the device, the faster it’s programmed. With data transfer rates to 50 Gb per second, and verify rates up to 200 MB per second, 9th Gen sites offer the industry’s fastest times with even more capacity compared to other systems in its class. This is up to 9 times faster than competing “universal” programmers, offering the Largest Memory Support in the industry―256 GB, upgradeable to 512 GB. Plus, by downloading image files up to 25 MB per second to all programmers simultaneously, the system rapidly produces devices at maximum achievable throughput.

PSV5000 vs BPM 3928

Comparing the two platforms (Data I/O vs. BPM) with similar specifications in a typical configuration, a Data I/O PSV5000 would require two FlashCORE III sites, plus one LumenX site (total of 3), while a BPM 3928 would require two 9th Gen sites (which is included in the basic machine configuration). The BPM 3928 is upgradable to five more sites (a total of seven); The PSV5000 can add three additional sites for a total of 6 sites. But only three or four could be used at a time (depending on which site technology is added). The BPM solution is much less expensive because it is actually universal, and allows you to utilize all the connected sites simultaneously.

One could argue that the PSV5000 could be set up with six FlashCORE III sites or six LumenX sites (for a total of 12 sites)– you would only have to switch out the sites when you set-up for the specific job. Realistically, that’s not a viable option. The price for just the sites would cost more than double the original PSV5000 and would take many additional hours to do each change-over.

In the case of a site failure (it happens), with BPM’s universal sites and fault-tolerant hardware/software, the “dead” site can be automatically bypassed; thus, production still goes on (albeit, at reduced capacity). Recall the mix of eMMC, MCU, and EPROM devices to program. Their “universal” solution would require two sets of sites; LumenX sites for faster programming with eMMC devices and FlashCORE III to program the others. if the single LumenX site goes out on the PSV5000, your programming on the LumenX site is stopped until you can get the site replaced or repaired.

It’s always a good idea to plan for failures (they happen) by having a spare site available on-site (all APS manufacturers can provide you with spare kits). With BPM’s single-site technology, you only need one spare, which saves thousands of dollars. When getting a quote on an APS, make sure to ask for spares (and if you’ll need just one or two).

Universal could also mean “future-proof.” Knowing that 9th Gen sites can program legacy devices as well as the newest flash devices means your investment is not soon obsolete. BPM has customers that are still programming on ten- to 15-year-old (and older) 8th and 7th Gen machines. BPM continues to provide support for these legacy systems, and plan to for the foreseeable future.

Sockets

Socket modules and socket cards are the electro-mechanical interfaces between the programmable semiconductor device and the programmer. It’s one of the secrets to BPM’s Universal Programming. The robust design is ideal for manufacturing and design environments where high signal integrity and reliable performance are critical.

The sophisticated technology of BPM Microsystems’ active circuitry delivers the cleanest waveform signals to the device by eliminating noise, ground bounce, and overshoot, which allows for the most reliable vector testing available to ensure the highest quality and overall yield.

Signal Integrity designed into the socket card allows for high quality/high-speed communication between the programmer and the device under test (DUT). High-quality communication allows for high-speed data transfer.  How?

  • Multiple layer PCBs
  • Ground plane
  • Controlled impedance
  • Active circuit
  • High-quality, gold-plated Samtec connectors on all 9th Gen Sites and Sockets


BPM Microsystems offers a substantial number of socket modules and socket cards to support thousands of devices from over 218 semiconductor manufacturers. Currently, there are over 39,000 devices supported on 9th Gen (three times greater than BPM’s nearest competitor).

New socket module and socket card designs are continuously added and can be requested to meet your programming needs (you can request support here).

“Universal” also means many of our older sockets (7th and 8th Gen) work with 9th Gen sites. When you upgrade to 9th Gen’s much faster programming protocol, it’s possible you can use your existing sockets (see if your socket is compatible here).

Universal Device programming with 9th Gen

First Article to automated device production, use the same software, same sockets, same algos, same results.

Finally, universal means using the same software (BPWin), and sockets/algos on all 9th Gen programmers, from manual to automated (the only additional thing needed on the automated programmers are pressure plates which are inexpensive and last forever). No matter if it’s the first article to final production, nearly everything is compatible.

Conclusion

BPM’s universal device programmers are truly universal, in every sense of the word. In an uncertain world during uncertain times, it’s comforting to know a BPM solution will deliver years of reliably programmed devices, and that “universal” actually means “universal.”