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BPM310 Automated Programming System Live Webinar, Part 1 though 12

BPM310 Automated Programming System Live Webinar, Part 1 though 12

BPM310 Automated Programming System Live Webinar, Part 1 though 12

In the BPM Microsystems live webinar demo held on March 23, 2023, the BPM310 Automated Programming System was showcased, highlighting its advanced features, unique capabilities, and ease of use. The presentation began with a warm welcome and introduction, followed by a brief overview of the 2900 Manual Programmer. The main focus of the webinar was on the BPM310 demo, which showcased the machine’s best-in-class features, such as its 10th Gen Universal Programming Technology, configurable and scalable design, and fault-tolerant capabilities.

The BPM310 demo illustrated how the machine can handle a wide range of devices, including MCUs, eMMC, and UFS, with just one programming site. Its double socket density compared to previous generations allows two programming sites to do the work of a four-site system, lowering capital expenditures and offering an amazing cost per device. The BPM310 can start with two sites and be field-upgraded as volumes increase, allowing for programming millions of devices per year. The machine’s fault-tolerant design features independent sites and sockets, with BPWin as its soul. There is virtually no learning curve when transitioning between 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th Gen systems. The webinar further elaborated on the machine layout, configuration, and its full-featured APS that can accommodate up to 6 sites or 48 sockets, effectively replacing the 4000 series machine.

Additionally, the webinar demonstrated the BPM310’s ease of use and self-installation features, such as the WhisperTeach, CyberOptics, and various teaching options for packages, trays, and tapes. Two different job scenarios were presented, with the first showcasing a tray stacker to tray stacker configuration, using 2 sites and Gang8 BGA153, and the second illustrating a tray stacker to tape output configuration, also using 2 sites and Gang8 BGA153. The presentation concluded with an overview of service, support, maintenance, advanced features, and a Q&A session to address any concerns or queries from the audience.

To view the entire 1-hour video, click here

BPM310 Webinar, parts 1-4

  1. Intro
  2. Manual Programmer
  3. BPM310 APS Overview
  4. Tray-to-Tray DemoOriginally recorded in Houston, Texas on March 23, 2023.

BPM310 Webinar, parts 5-8

5. Tray-to-Tray Demo
6. CyberOptics On-the-fly Vision Centering
7. Tray to Tape Demo
8. WhisperTeach™ Auto Z-height

Originally recorded in Houston, Texas on March 23, 2023.

BPM310 Webinar, parts 9-12

9. Service Overview
10. Maintenance Overview
11. Advanced Features
12. Q&A, Next Steps

Originally recorded in Houston, Texas on March 23, 2023.

BPM Microsystems to Showcase BPM310 Automated Programming System at SMTConnect 2023 in Nuremberg, Germany

BPM Microsystems to Showcase BPM310 Automated Programming System at SMTConnect 2023 in Nuremberg, Germany

BPM Microsystems, a leading provider of programming solutions, is proud to announce its participation at SMTConnect 2023 in Nuremberg, Germany from May 9-11, 2023. BPM Microsystems will be showcasing its latest innovation, the BPM310 Automated Programming System, at Hall 4, Stand 147, in partnership with their European Distributor, Adaptsys, Ltd.

BPM Microsystems is demonstrating its latest innovation in automated programming technology, the BPM310. This 10th Generation Programmer boasts up to 6 fully universal programming sites with up to 48 sockets, providing the fastest programming times while occupying the smallest footprint. Advanced features such as WhisperTeach™, BPM.NCRYPT, and on-the-fly vision alignment are also included. With true universal support, the BPM310 can program UFS, Microcontrollers, Memory, and Complex Devices to support a wide range of chip-scale packages and QFPs at unparalleled speeds. The BPM310 is set to revolutionize the industry with its cutting-edge features and performance.

“We are excited to showcase the BPM310 Automated Programming System at SMTConnect 2023,” says William White, Founder and CEO of BPM Microsystems. “Our latest innovation is a testament to our commitment to developing cutting-edge technology that meets the evolving needs of our customers. The BPM310 offers unmatched speed, precision, and versatility, making it the ideal solution for high-volume programming applications.”

Adaptsys, BPM Microsystems’ European distributor, will be on hand to provide demonstrations and technical support throughout the event. For the past 20+ years, Adaptsys has had a strong reputation for providing top-notch programming solutions and support services to customers across Europe.

“We are pleased to be joining BPM Microsystems at SMTConnect 2023 to showcase the BPM310 Automated Programming System,” says James Cawkell, General Manager at Adaptsys. “Our team has extensive experience in programming technology, and we are committed to providing the highest level of support to our customers. We look forward to showcasing this new technology and meeting with customers.”

SMTConnect is a premier event for the electronics manufacturing industry, attracting attendees from around the world to showcase the latest technologies and innovations. BPM Microsystems and Adaptsys will be among the exhibitors showcasing their latest solutions and services.

About BPM Microsystems

BPM Microsystems is a leading provider of programming solutions for the electronics manufacturing industry. With over 30 years of experience, BPM Microsystems has a proven track record of delivering reliable and high-performance programming solutions that help customers optimize their production processes. The company offers a complete suite of offline programming solutions, including manual and automated programming systems, algorithms, software, adapters, and accessories.

About Adaptsys

Adaptsys is a leading provider of programming solutions and support services for the electronics manufacturing industry. With over 20 years of experience, Adaptsys has a strong reputation for delivering reliable and high-performance programming solutions to customers across Europe. The company offers a wide range of products and services, including programming equipment, software, and technical support.

For more information, visit BPM Microsystems and Adaptsys websites or stop by Hall 4, Stand 147 at SMTConnect 2023 to see the BPM310 Automated Programming System in action.

Go to Event Page | Sign up for One-on-One Demo

https://bpmMicro.com

https://www.adaptsys.com

https://smt.mesago.com/nuremberg/en.html

White Paper: Semiconductor Device programming

White Paper: Semiconductor Device programming

White Paper: Semiconductor Device programming

What it is and why it’s important

Semiconductor device programming is a critical process in the manufacturing and development of electronic devices. It involves the programming of specific parameters and functionality into a semiconductor device, such as a microcontroller or memory chip, to ensure that it performs the desired tasks.

There are several different techniques used in semiconductor device programming, including in-system programming, in-circuit programming, and offline programming. In-system programming involves programming the device while it is installed in a larger system, such as a computer or a smartphone. In-circuit programming involves programming the device while it is still on the circuit board before it is assembled into the final product. Off-line programming involves programming the device while it is removed from any system or circuit board, using specialized programming equipment.

One of the main reasons why semiconductor device programming is important is that it allows manufacturers to customize the functionality of their devices to meet the specific needs of their customers. For example, a manufacturer of smartphones may use semiconductor device programming to customize the operating system, applications, and other features of their phones to meet the requirements of different carriers or market segments.

Another reason why semiconductor device programming is important is that it allows for the creation of new and innovative electronic devices. By programming specific functionality into a semiconductor device, engineers and designers can create products that perform a wide range of tasks and functions, from simple tasks such as controlling a light bulb to complex tasks such as running a self-driving car.

Semiconductor device programming also plays a crucial role in the maintenance and repair of electronic devices. When a device fails or experiences problems, programmers may be called upon to reprogram the device to restore its original functionality or to update it with new features and capabilities.

Overall, semiconductor device programming is a vital process that plays a key role in the development, customization, and maintenance of electronic devices. It allows manufacturers to create innovative products that meet the specific needs of their customers, and it enables the creation of new and advanced technologies that drive the advancement of the electronic industry.

History of device programming: how it has evolved over time

Semiconductor device programming has come a long way since its inception in the mid-20th century. From simple switches and relays to complex microprocessors and integrated circuits, the world of electronic devices has been transformed by the development of semiconductor programming techniques.

The first semiconductor devices were invented in the late 1940s, using germanium as the primary material. These devices were simple switches or relays that could be used to control electric current flow in a circuit. However, they were expensive and prone to failure due to their fragile nature.

In the 1950s, silicon was introduced as a more reliable and cost-effective material for semiconductor devices. This paved the way for the development of the first microprocessors, which were small computers that could be used to perform basic calculations.

The 1970s saw the emergence of microcontrollers, which are small computers that can be programmed to perform specific tasks. These devices were used in everything from appliances to automobiles, and their popularity paved the way for the development of more advanced microprocessors.

In the 1980s and 1990s, the use of semiconductor devices expanded rapidly as technology advanced. The development of the internet and personal computers led to the creation of complex integrated circuits that could be used in a variety of applications.

Today, semiconductor devices are used in almost every electronic device, from smartphones to medical equipment. They have become essential components in modern society, and their continued evolution has had a huge impact on the way we live and work.

As technology continues to advance, it is likely that semiconductor device programming will continue to evolve and improve. With the development of artificial intelligence and the internet of things, the potential for new and innovative uses of these devices is endless.

In conclusion, the history of semiconductor device programming has been one of rapid evolution and innovation. From simple switches to complex microprocessors, these devices have transformed the world of electronic devices and continue to play a vital role in modern society.

There are several high-trust sources for information on semiconductor device programming

International Electrotechnical Commission

The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is a global organization that publishes international standards for a wide range of electrical and electronic technologies, including semiconductor device programming. The IEC provides specifications and guidelines for the programming of semiconductor devices, including those used in automotive, industrial, and consumer applications.

Joint Electron Device Engineering Council

The Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC) is a global organization that develops standards for the semiconductor industry. JEDEC’s standards include those for semiconductor device programming, and the organization provides guidelines and specifications for the programming of a wide range of semiconductor devices.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional organization for engineers and scientists in the field of electrical and electronic engineering. The IEEE publishes a wide range of technical publications, including journals and conference proceedings, that cover various aspects of semiconductor device programming.

Semiconductor Manufacturers

Semiconductor manufacturers such as Texas Instruments, Micron, Microchip/Microsemi, NXP, Renesas, Intel, and many others usually have their own technical documentation and application notes available on their websites which include information about their own specific devices and programming methods.

Different types of devices and how they are programmed

Semiconductor devices are a crucial component in the field of electronics, playing a vital role in the functioning of various electronic systems. These devices are used to amplify, switch, and process electronic signals, making them an essential component in everything from computers and cell phones to televisions and automobiles.

There are various types of semiconductor devices that are used for different purposes, each with unique characteristics and capabilities. In this article, we will discuss the different types of semiconductor devices and how they are programmed.

Types of Semiconductor Devices:

Transistor: A transistor is a three-terminal device that is used to amplify or switch electronic signals. It is made of semiconductor material, typically silicon, and consists of three layers called a base, collector, and emitter.

The base layer is a thin layer of semiconductor material that controls the flow of current between the collector and emitter layers. The collector layer is a heavily doped layer of semiconductor material that collects the amplified signal, while the emitter layer is a heavily doped layer of semiconductor material that emits the amplified signal.

Transistors are classified based on their construction and the type of semiconductor material used. The most common types of transistors are bipolar transistors and field-effect transistors (FETs).

Integrated Circuit (IC): An integrated circuit (IC) is a miniature electronic circuit that is made up of a large number of transistors, diodes, and other electronic components that are fabricated on a single semiconductor chip.

ICs are classified based on the number of transistors they contain and the type of technology used to fabricate them. The most common types of ICs are microprocessors, memory chips, and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs).

Diode: A diode is a two-terminal device that is used to allow current to flow in one direction and block current in the opposite direction. It is made of semiconductor material, typically silicon, and consists of two layers called anode and cathode.

The anode layer is a heavily doped layer of semiconductor material that allows current to flow into the diode, while the cathode layer is a lightly doped layer of semiconductor material that blocks current from flowing out of the diode.

Diodes are classified based on the type of semiconductor material used and the type of construction. The most common types of diodes are rectifier diodes, Zener diodes, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

Programming Semiconductor Devices: Semiconductor devices are programmed using a variety of techniques, depending on the type of device and the intended application. Some common programming techniques include:

Firmware: Firmware is a type of software that is embedded in a semiconductor device and controls its operation. It is typically stored in ROM (read-only memory) and is used to initialize the device and perform various functions.

Hardware Description Language (HDL): Hardware Description Language (HDL) is a programming language that is used to design and implement electronic systems at the hardware level. It is used to describe the behavior and structure of a semiconductor device in a high-level language that can be synthesized into hardware.

Machine Language: Machine language is a low-level programming language that is used to program microprocessors and other semiconductor devices at the hardware level. It consists of a series of instructions that are written in binary code and executed by the device.

The role of software in device programming

The semiconductor industry plays a crucial role in the modern world, with applications ranging from electronic devices to energy systems and transportation. A key aspect of semiconductor devices is their ability to be programmed, enabling them to perform specific tasks and functions. This programming is achieved through the use of software, which plays a vital role in the development and operation of these devices.

In the early stages of semiconductor device development, software is used to design and simulate the device’s performance. This allows engineers to test and optimize the device’s functionality before it is physically manufactured. Software tools such as Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and simulation software are essential in this process, as they provide a virtual environment to design and test the device’s behavior.

Once the semiconductor device is manufactured, software is used to program and configure it for specific tasks. This process, known as device programming, involves writing code and uploading it onto the device through specialized programming tools. The code is typically written in a high-level programming language and then compiled into machine code that the device can understand.

Device programming is essential for the functionality of many semiconductor devices. For example, microcontrollers, which are used in a wide range of electronic devices, require programming to perform specific tasks such as controlling the device’s functions or receiving input from sensors. Similarly, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) require programming to perform specified logic functions, and memory devices need to be programmed to store and retrieve data.

Software also plays a role in the ongoing operation of semiconductor devices. Many devices are equipped with firmware, which is a type of software that is stored in the device’s memory and controls its behavior. Firmware is used to manage the device’s resources, such as memory and processing power, and to perform tasks such as booting up the device and managing its inputs and outputs.

In addition to its role in device programming and operation, software is also used to monitor and diagnose the performance of semiconductor devices. Tools such as debuggers and emulators allow engineers to identify and troubleshoot issues with the device’s performance, ensuring that it is operating correctly.

Overall, software plays a crucial role in the development and operation of semiconductor devices. From design and simulation to programming and ongoing operation, software tools enable the creation and functionality of these essential devices. As the semiconductor industry continues to advance, the role of software will only become more important in the development and operation of these devices.

Challenges and limitations of semiconductor device programming

The semiconductor industry has made significant progress in the development of advanced technologies and devices that have revolutionized the way we live and work. However, the programming of these devices is not without its challenges and limitations.

One of the main challenges faced by semiconductor device programming is the need for precise control over the physical properties of the device. Semiconductor devices are typically manufactured using high-resolution photolithography techniques, which require a high level of accuracy and control. Any deviation from the desired specifications can result in poor device performance or even device failure.

Another challenge is the complexity of modern semiconductor devices. As devices become more advanced, they require more complex programming techniques and algorithms. This increases the risk of programming errors and can lead to delays in device development and production.

One limitation of semiconductor device programming is the need for specialized equipment and software. This can be costly and may not be readily available to all manufacturers, particularly those in emerging markets. In addition, the frequent updates and upgrades to programming equipment and software can also be a financial burden.

Another limitation is the limited number of programming languages and platforms available. While there are a variety of programming languages and platforms available, each has its own specific set of capabilities and limitations. This can be a challenge for developers who are looking to optimize their device performance and functionality.

Finally, there is the issue of intellectual property protection. As semiconductor devices become more advanced and valuable, there is an increasing risk of intellectual property theft and piracy. This can be a major challenge for manufacturers who rely on proprietary programming techniques and algorithms.

In conclusion, the programming of semiconductor devices is a complex and constantly evolving field that faces a number of challenges and limitations. From the need for precise control and complex algorithms to the availability of specialized equipment and the issue of intellectual property protection, manufacturers must navigate these challenges in order to create high-quality and reliable devices.

Tips and best practices for device programming

As the use of semiconductor devices continues to increase in a variety of industries, it is important to ensure that they are programmed correctly in order to function properly. In this white paper, we will discuss some tips and best practices for semiconductor device programming to help you achieve optimal results.

  • Use the correct programming software: It is essential to use the correct programming software for your specific semiconductor device. Using the wrong software can result in errors or even damage to the device. Make sure to read the documentation provided by the manufacturer or consult with a technical support representative to determine the correct software for your device.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions: The manufacturer’s instructions for programming your semiconductor device should always be followed to ensure proper function. These instructions may include specific programming voltages, programming speeds, and other important details.
  • Use the correct programming equipment: In addition to using the correct programming software, it is also important to use the correct programming equipment. This may include a programmer, probes, and other specialized tools. Using the wrong equipment can lead to errors or damage to the device.
  • Verify programming: After programming your semiconductor device, it is important to verify that the programming was successful. This can be done through various testing methods such as running functional tests or performing a readback of the device.
  • Follow proper handling procedures: Semiconductor devices are sensitive and can be easily damaged if not handled properly. It is important to follow proper handling procedures, such as using an anti-static wrist strap, to prevent damage to the device during programming.

By following these tips and best practices, you can ensure that your semiconductor devices are programmed correctly and functioning optimally. Proper programming is crucial for the performance and reliability of these devices, and taking the time to follow these guidelines will pay off in the long run.

The Impact of Device Programming on the Manufacturing Process

Semiconductor devices are a crucial component of many modern electronic devices, from smartphones to computers to aircraft navigation systems. These devices are made using a complex manufacturing process that involves several steps, including the programming of the devices to perform specific functions.

In recent years, the programming of semiconductor devices has become an increasingly important aspect of the manufacturing process. This is because the increasing complexity and capability of modern electronic devices have led to a greater demand for more sophisticated semiconductor devices.

One of the key benefits of programming semiconductor devices is that it allows manufacturers to customize the devices to meet the specific needs of their customers. This can include adding new features or capabilities to the devices or optimizing their performance for a particular application.

In addition to improving the functionality of the devices, programming semiconductor devices also has a number of other benefits for the manufacturing process. For example, it allows manufacturers to more easily test and debug the devices, ensuring that they are functioning correctly before they are shipped to customers.

The programming of semiconductor devices is typically done using specialized software tools and equipment. These tools allow manufacturers to program the devices with precise instructions, ensuring that they are able to perform their intended functions accurately and reliably.

Overall, the programming of semiconductor devices is a vital part of the manufacturing process, and it plays a key role in the development of modern electronic devices. As the demand for more advanced and capable electronic devices continues to grow, the importance of programming semiconductor devices will likely only increase.

Popular semiconductor device programming software and tools

Semiconductor devices are an integral part of modern electronic systems. These devices are typically programmed using specialized software and tools that allow engineers and technicians to design, test, and debug their circuits and systems.

There are several popular programming software and tools available for use in semiconductor device development, each with its own unique features and capabilities.

One of the most widely used software platforms is Cadence Virtuoso, which is a comprehensive design suite for analog, digital, and mixed-signal circuits. It offers a range of powerful tools for schematic capture, simulation, layout, and verification, as well as support for various semiconductor technologies such as CMOS, BiCMOS, and SiGe.

Another popular software platform is Synopsys Design Compiler, which is a high-performance logic synthesis tool for creating optimized gate-level designs from RTL (register-transfer level) code. It has a powerful optimization engine and supports a wide range of libraries and design styles, making it a versatile tool for a variety of semiconductor applications.

For testing and debugging semiconductor devices, the Agilent Technologies Waveform Viewer is a useful tool that allows users to visualize and analyze waveform data in real time. It supports a range of file formats and can be used with a variety of oscilloscopes and measurement equipment.

In the realm of hardware programming tools, the Xilinx Vivado Design Suite is a comprehensive platform that supports the development of FPGA (field-programmable gate array) and SoC (system-on-chip) designs. It offers a range of features for high-level synthesis, RTL design, and hardware verification, as well as support for various programming languages such as VHDL and Verilog.

There are also several specialized programming tools available for specific semiconductor technologies, such as the Mentor Graphics Tanner EDA suite for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and the Analog Devices VisualDSP++ for digital signal processing (DSP) applications.

In conclusion, there are a variety of popular programming software and tools available for use in semiconductor device development, each with its own unique features and capabilities. Whether you are designing analog circuits, synthesizing logic gates, or programming FPGAs and SoCs, there is a tool available to help you get the job done.

The role of automation in device programming

BPM310 Automated programming systemAutomation plays a crucial role in the semiconductor device programming process. Semiconductor devices are used in a variety of electronic devices, including computers, smartphones, and televisions. These devices are made up of tiny transistors, which are responsible for processing and storing data. In order to create these devices, transistors must be programmed with specific instructions. This process is known as semiconductor device programming.

One of the main benefits of automation in semiconductor device programming is increased efficiency. Automation allows for faster and more accurate programming of transistors, as it eliminates the need for manual intervention. This not only saves time but also reduces the risk of errors.

Automation also allows for the production of larger quantities of semiconductor devices at a lower cost. As the programming process is automated, there is less need for labor, which can significantly reduce production costs. This is especially important in the semiconductor industry, where demand for devices is constantly increasing.

Automation also allows for additional functions, such as marking (laser, inkjet, etc), media transfer (tape to tray, tray to reel, etc), inspection, and more.

Another benefit of automation in semiconductor device programming is the ability to program transistors with more complex instructions. As technology continues to advance, the capabilities of transistors are also increasing. Automation allows for the programming of transistors with increasingly complex instructions, which enables the creation of more advanced electronic devices.

In addition to the benefits mentioned above, automation in device programming also allows for improved consistency and quality control. As the programming process is automated, there is less room for human error, which leads to a higher level of consistency in the finished products. This is especially important in the contract manufacturing and automotive industries, where even small defects can have serious consequences.

Overall, automation plays a crucial role in the semiconductor device programming process. It increases efficiency, reduces costs, and enables the creation of more advanced electronic devices. As technology continues to advance, it is likely that automation will become even more prevalent in the semiconductor industry.

Future of semiconductor device programming: trends and predictions

The semiconductor industry has always been at the forefront of technological advancement, driving the development of new and innovative devices and systems. As we move into the future, the programming of semiconductor devices is set to play a crucial role in the evolution of technology.

One of the most significant trends in semiconductor device programming is the increasing demand for low-power, high-performance devices. With the proliferation of IoT (Internet of Things) devices and the growing demand for mobile and wearable technology, there is a need for semiconductor devices that can perform at high levels while consuming minimal power. This has led to the development of new programming techniques and technologies that enable the creation of more efficient devices.

Another major trend in semiconductor device programming is the growing importance of cybersecurity. As more devices become connected to the internet and the amount of sensitive data being transmitted increases, there is a need for secure programming techniques that can protect against cyber threats. This is particularly important in the IoT space, where the number of connected devices is expected to increase significantly in the coming years.

Another key trend in semiconductor device programming is the increasing use of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. These technologies are being used to improve the accuracy and efficiency of programming, as well as to develop new programming methods and algorithms. For example, AI and machine learning can be used to optimize programming for specific applications or to identify and fix errors in code.

Finally, there is a prediction that the use of quantum computing will become increasingly important in the future of semiconductor device programming. Quantum computers have the potential to significantly accelerate the processing of data and the development of new algorithms, which could revolutionize the way semiconductor devices are programmed.

Overall, the future of semiconductor device programming looks bright, with new technologies and techniques emerging that will enable the creation of faster, more efficient, and more secure devices. As the demand for connected devices and the proliferation of data continues to grow, the programming of semiconductor devices will play a crucial role in driving the evolution of technology.

BPM Microsystems to Showcase the BPM310 Automated Programmer at IPC APEX 2023

BPM Microsystems to Showcase the BPM310 Automated Programmer at IPC APEX 2023

BPM Microsystems, Inc. will display its 10th Generation programming technology platform and the BPM310 Automated Programming System at the IPC APEX Expo, starting January 24, 2023, in San Diego, California. The 10th Generation offers the industry’s fastest programming times for UFS, eMMC, Flash, and MCUs with twice as many sockets per site as its predecessor. The BPM310 offers a capacity of up to 48 sockets, automotive-level quality, and reliability in a small footprint. 10th Gen delivers the fastest UFS programming performance in the industry achieving up to 440MB per second Read and 201MB per second Write. First-part time is accelerated owing to the fact that UFS programming can commence without pausing for data to download.

IPC APEX ’23

IPC APEX Expo is the largest event for electronics manufacturing in North America, attracting more than 9,000 professionals from 45 countries. From the industry’s leading technical conference and application-focused professional development courses to the innovation-driven exhibit floor, IPC APEX EXPO 2023 will be packed with seminars, awards, and amazing technology.

BPM is celebrating 22 years of exhibiting at APEX on its 38th anniversary as a company. Make plans now to attend IPC APEX Expo ’23 January 24-26, 2023 at the San Diego Convention Center (view event page here).

BPM310 APS

The BPM310 is positioned to outperform higher-priced systems and includes advanced features such as WhisperTeach™, on-the-fly vision alignment, CSP support, serialization, encryption, and JobMaster while providing true universal technology. 10th Gen supports the broadest range of devices including MCUs, eMMC, NAND, Serial Flash, UFS, and others. Highly configurable, the BPM310 provides options for Tape I/O, Tray I/O, Tube I/O, laser marking, and 3D inspection. 

“We’re excited to demonstrate the BPM310 at APEX 2023,” says Colin Harper, Global Sales Director at BPM. “The market response to this highly configurable, socket-dense machine has been tremendous. The small footprint, amazing productivity, and ease of use set it apart in the industry.”

The BPM310 leverages much of the socket adapter and algorithm development currently available on BPM’s 9th Generation systems. And like all 9th Gen automated programmers, the BPM310 continues to offer ease of operation and fast setup with award-winning BPWin process control software and patented WhisperTeach™. WhisperTeach™ automatically teaches the critical Z-height of each pick/place location with 15-micron accuracy. Accurate automated teaching is vital for small packages due to fundamental human limitations. In addition, WhisperTeach™ saves an average of 83% of the time required for the job setup compared to traditional methods while increasing quality and yield

BPM manufactures its 10th Generation systems in their ISO 9001:2015 certified plant located in Houston, Texas, and their products carry the CE Mark. BPM continues to offer 9th Generation programmers for manual and automated programming. If you are coming to APEX 2023, visit booth 1219 from January 24, 2023, through January 26, 2023, in beautiful San Diego, to see a live BPM310 demo. For more information on the BPM310, go to bpmmicro.com/BPM310.

Set Appointment for One-on-One Demo | View Event Page

Device Support Lead Time Update

Device Support Lead Time Update

BPM is pleased to update the estimated support lead times for a variety of devices

BPM has nearly doubled the engineering staff in Device Support in the past year. We have more resources than we’ve ever had and adding even more team members. This is helping to reduce lead times for new device support requests (DSRs). We’ve also segmented support by device type and complexity. The following chart breaks it down:

Algo Device Support Request by Device Type Algo Lead Time
Simple Update: 5 Days
Package Addition: 2 Weeks
NOR Flash, Serial NOR Flash, EEPROM, Serial EEPROM, Parallel EEPROM, Raw NAND, eMMC, HS200 or HS400 eMMC, Simple PLD: 4 Weeks
Simple Microcontroller, Standard Microcontroller: 4 to 8 Weeks (depends on complexity)
Complex PLD, Actel Flash, Actel Antifuse: 8 Weeks
Raw NAND with BBM, Complex Microcontroller, FPGA, BBM Scheme, Complex Xilinx Antifuse: Requires Research to Quote

BPM currently supports over 70,000 devices from over 200 manufacturers. For the supported device search, click here.

Current BPM customers get free Algorithm Support Credits (up to six $500 credits) for new support with a current Software Agreement. Manual production programmers get four algorithm credits; Automated Programmers get six algorithm credits, good for one year. You can learn more here. To request new device support with faster device support lead times, click here.

Support Agreement

BPM’s production level support agreement is designed for those customers who run critical operations and demand the highest level of support possible, and includes the following:

  • 24/7 Hotline: +1 832-617-5702
    You can report issues with device production outside of normal business hours. The customer will be put into contact with a live Field Service Engineer (for APS-related issues) or Customer Service Engineer (for device-related issues). Engineers will work with customers to collect all data on the issue, provide debug steps to resolve the issue over the phone, and will immediately create a BPM case if the issue requires additional time to resolve. This service is available to any BPM customer located in North America (Canada, the US, and Mexico). Fees apply if not covered by the current service/software contract.
  • Spare Parts
    Warranty replacement parts can ship from our headquarters in Houston, Texas, or directly from one of our global stock locations. Warranty replacement does not cover consumable parts or damage caused by the customer. In the case of local spare parts, customers have had replacement parts at their facility installed in less than 30 minutes.
  • Priority Case Handling
    You will receive priority in our new customer relationship management system. All of your incoming cases will receive a special tag that designates you as a full support user and we will prioritize your requests as necessary.
  • On-Site Support
    On-site support does not require a PO for labor hours when you are under a hardware contract.
Learn More

If you would like to learn more about BPM or have a service or technical-related question, please call  +1 (713) 688-4600, toll-free in the US at (855) SELL BPM, or 24/7 Service hotline at +1 (832) 617-5702. You can also email technical support at tech@bpmmicro.com.


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